The Talon Trust has several resident raptors. These birds suffered injuries that deemed them unreleasable back into the wild. Many of the birds become ambassadors for our educational programs. Learn more about our residents below.

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    Pippin came to us in 2016, and it appears he must have had a collision with something in his first year and broke his wrist, which never healed properly so he is unable to fly.  He is a big personality (he is a Kestrel, after all!), and will surely entertain and educate audiences for years to come.  He will hopefully start training to become one of our educational program birds this year to join our veteran Kestrel Skylar!

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    "Kat" was found in a rural backyard in Boonville, IN in 2016 starved and unable to fly.  He was missing almost all of his primary feathers on one wing, but as to why is still a mystery.  He has befriended our female great horned owl Hattie, and you'll often find the two of them huddled on the top rungs of their favorite ladder in their mew, sometimes looking like an owl totem pole!  Kat is currently in training to become one of our educational program birds.

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    Elvira is new to the crew as of summer 2017. She will hopefully start training to become one of our educational program birds soon!

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    Skylar was found on the ground in central Indiana shortly after fledging the nest in 2007. He had a dislocated right shoulder that never healed correctly so he cannot fly. Yet, he gets around in his custom enclosure very well and enjoys the room service.  He is old for a kestrel, but you can’t tell him that. He is quite a personality and eager to socialize.  A true teacher at heart, he often calls an entire crowd over to pay attention to him and encourages them to ignore his handler. Since he has been in captivity since his first spring, he has become very domesticated.  He loves people and the attention they deliver, and he does all the programs we will allow him.

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    Luta had a collision with something unknown and broke her left wing. She was found in the Newburgh area in 2016, as a juvenile in her first spring. She is a new resident with us and we will be working with her to train her to the glove. We expect she will be a great program bird. Luta is Lakota for “red”.

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    Hattie had a collision with a car in central Indiana in 2007. She damaged the tip of her left wing and now cannot gain altitude in flight.  Hattie is named after Liz and Chris Hatton, rehabilitators that nurtured her back to health in north central Indiana. She was a "haggard" bird when she was injured, meaning old and set in her ways.  She is still a bit testy and poses as a chicken quite often, as she seems scared of everything.  That is incredible, really, since she is our most dangerous and powerful bird, and in the wild would eat entire skunks and opossums and the like. She gets out of most programs this way, so it is working for her. She shares a mew and has befriended our male great horned owl "Kat".

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    Banshee was injured in a collision with a car in the Evansville area in 2003.  His left shoulder is permanently dislocated so he cannot fly.  Banshee is at least 15+ years old, and is retired from public programs. He doesn’t like doing them, and lets us know with an ear piercing, headache-inducing scream.  It is quite distracting to the audience while we are trying to conduct a program. He’s good at reminding us that at his age he should be retired, so we've respected his wishes.

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    Atticus had a collision with something, likely a car, and has permanent eye damage and partial blindness. He was found in the Evansville area as a juvenile in his first spring of 2016. He is also a new resident with us and we will be training him to be a great program bird.

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    Luna suffered a collision with a car in the Evansville area in 2007. She is fully flighted, but is handicapped for hunting due to the resulting blindness in her right eye. She sees well in her other eye, however, and trains it in a glaring stare on anything that looks unpleasant.  She is trained to do programs, and furthermore insists on stardom treatment, as any diva would. She is cool, calm, and collected in programs, and strives to give the appearance that nothing can ruffle her feathers.

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    Hoot was found on the ground in the Evansville area in 2012. Having just fledged the nest, he could not perch or hunt properly due to a deformed left foot, which did not form properly below the ankle. He doesn't do programs yet, so his main occupation is to beg for food (as all teenagers do), and incessantly pester Luna, our other barred owl.