The Talon Trust has several resident raptors. These birds suffered injuries that deemed them unreleasable back into the wild. Many of the birds become ambassadors for our educational programs. Learn more about our residents below.

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    Sassafras aka "Sassy" aka "Sass" was found on the ground in Gibson County in the spring of 2019 as a youngster with a bad wing break that was too far healed out of place to be fixable. As a result, she is not flighted and cannot be released. Sass is currently in bootcamp with volunteer Regina getting glove trained so that she can join our educational programs in the future. Her name says it all, a typical sassy great horned owl!

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    Bio coming soon!

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    Harley came to us in 2018 from a local falconer.

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    Jack came to us in the winter of 2017-18.  It appears someone had shot him, as the vet found steel shot in several places in his body, he has lost an eye, and cannot fly. Look out for him along with our other raptor ambassadors in programs soon!

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    Grey was found on the side of the road with a severe concussion in 2017, presumably from a car collision. As a result she was left with eye damage and a broken wrist. She is almost flighted, but not enough to gain altitude to hunt properly. So she has joined our educational program team. 'Though she be little she is fierce' is the perfect quote for this little gal.

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    Pippin came to us in 2016, after having a collision with something that left him with a broken wrist that didn't heal properly so he is unable to fly.  He is a big personality (he is a Kestrel, after all!), and is part of our educational program team.

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    Luta was found on the ground in the Newburgh area in 2016 as a juvenile in her first spring. She had a collision with something unknown that left her with a broken left wing that did not heal properly, thus she cannot fly well enough to survive in the wild. She has been trained to the glove and is now part of our educational program team. Luta is Lakota for “red”.

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    Hattie had a collision with a car in central Indiana in 2007. She damaged the tip of her left wing and now cannot gain altitude in flight.  Hattie is named after Liz and Chris Hatton, rehabilitators that nurtured her back to health in north central Indiana. She was a haggard bird when she was injured, meaning old and set in her ways. She is our most fierce predator, yet she is a big turkey! You'll find her perched at the top of her favorite ladder making an owl totem pole with her 'mew'-mate Kat.

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    Atticus was found as a juvenile bird in his first spring on the ground after a car collision in Evansville in 2016, which left him with permanent eye damage and partial blindness. He has been trained and is now part of our educational program team.

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    Luna suffered a collision with a car in the Evansville area in 2007. She is fully flighted, but is handicapped for hunting due to the resulting blindness in her right eye. She sees well in her other eye, however, and trains it in a glaring stare on anything that looks unpleasant.  She is trained to do programs, and furthermore insists on stardom treatment, as any diva would. She is cool, calm, and collected in programs, and strives to give the appearance that nothing can ruffle her feathers.

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    Hoot was found on the ground in the Evansville area in 2012. Having just fledged the nest, he could not perch or hunt properly due to a deformed left foot, which did not form properly below the ankle. He doesn't do programs yet, so his main occupation is to beg for food (as all teenagers do), and pester his 'mew'-mate Luna.